Archive for LA Weekly – Page 2

“Gidion’s Knot” – Los Angeles theater review for LA Weekly

Photo by Anthony Masters Photography.

Photo by Anthony Masters Photography.

 

Gentle readers! This week’s theater review for the LA Weekly is of Gidion’s Knot, presented by Furious Theatre Company and now playing at the Pasadena Playhouse, upstairs.

We gave it ‘Pick of the Week.’

 

Gidion’s Knot

Aaron Francis’ bold scenic design has the audience seated in school desks for Gidion’s Knot, getting you into the right frame of mind for Johnna Adams intense one-act showdown between a 5th grade teacher and a parent.

Corryn (Vonessa Martin) shows up for a teacher-parent conference, having been summoned a few days earlier by Miss Clark (Paula Cale Lisbe) after she inexplicably suspended Corryn’s son Gidion. The 11-year-old child has since committed suicide, so Miss Clark assumed the meeting wasn’t going to happen, and is ill prepared when Corryn shows up anyway, wanting answers. The bereft mother becomes increasingly incensed by the teacher’s evasive behavior. Throughout the play, certain details are clawed into the open…

To read the remainder of this review, go here to the LA Weekly’s theater page.

Gidion’s Knot

Furious Theatre Company at the Pasadena Playhouse
39 S. El Molino Ave.,
Pasadena

Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.;
Sundays, 2:30 & 7:30 p.m.
Continues through November 24, 2013.
626-356-PLAY

 

 

 

“Creditors” – Los Angeles theater review for LA Weekly

Photo by Ron Sossi.

Photo by Ron Sossi.

 

Dear readers! This week’s theater review for the LA Weekly is of Creditors, now playing at the Odyssey Theatre in West L.A.

We gave it ‘Pick of the Week.’

 

Creditors

A despondent young artist, Adolf (Burt Grinstead), laments his problematic marriage, pouring his heart out to a new acquaintance, Gustav (Jack Stehlin), at a Swedish seaside resort. But as Gustav pries secrets from the weak-willed husband, smoothly poisoning him against his divorcée wife, Tekla (Heather Anne Prete), we observe tantalizing clues, revealing that this friendly fellow somehow knows too much. Incisively directed by David Trainer, playwright David Grieg’s new version of August Strindberg’s turn-of-the-century psychological thriller is a talky play that draws you in with its hypnotic spell.

To read the remainder of this review, go here to the LA Weekly’s theater page.

Creditors

New American Theatre and the Odyssey Theatre

2055 S. Sepulveda Blvd.,

West L.A.;

Fri.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2 p.m.

(added perfs Oct. 30, Nov. 7, 13 & 21, Dec. 14, 8 p.m.; pay-what-you-can)

(310) 477-2055, ext. 2

 

 

 

 

“Rumination” – Los Angeles theater review for LA Weekly

Photo by Zombie Joe.

Photo by Zombie Joe.

Hello again dear readers!

My second review this week for the LA Weekly is of Rumination, now playing at the Zombie Joe’s Underground Theatre in North Hollywood.

Rumination

This one-act celebrates the prolific works of 13th-century Persian poet and Sufi mystic Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī– commonly known as Rumi. A sampling of Rumi’s sacred poetry is delivered as choral readings, employing dance, gesture and song to supplement his magical (though nonrhyming) verse. Conceived by Amir Khalighi, the selected poetry examines various facets of love, emotions, nature, truth and beauty, delving into the essence of human existence.

To read the remainder of this review, go here to the LA Weekly’s theater page.

Rumination

Zombie Joe’s Underground Theatre

4850 Lankershim Blvd.,

North Hollywood.;

Sun., 7 p.m.; through Oct. 27.

(818) 202-4120

 

 

 

 

“Silent Witnesses” – solo show at Whitefire – Los Angeles theater review for LA Weekly

Silent Witnesses 18

Hello dear readers!

This week my theater review for the LA Weekly is of Silent Witnesses, the solo show about a group of holocaust child survivors — now playing at the Whitefire Theatre in Sherman Oaks.

Silent Witnesses

After surviving internment in a Nazi death camp as a child, Stephanie Satie found that her grim experiences were eclipsed by survivors who lived through camps as adults, because they were viewed as higher up in the “hierarchy of suffering.” The cultural revolution of 1970s prompted an era of self-exploration and brought three other child-survivors to her therapy door. The quartet of women regularly met to relate their “forbidden” stories, which had been buried for years.

To read the remainder of this review, go here to the LA Weekly’s theater page (and scroll down a bit).

Whitefire Theatre

13500 Ventura Blvd.,

Sherman Oaks;

Sun., 7:30 p.m.

(800) 838-3006

 

 

“Humor Abuse” – Los Angeles theater review for LA Weekly

Photo by Craig Schwartz.

Photo by Craig Schwartz.

 

Gentle readers! This week my theater review for the LA Weekly is of Humor Abuse, the solo biographical show about a clown’s life now playing at the Mark Taper Forum in Downtown LA.

We gave it a ‘GO!’

Humor Abuse

As the title indicates, Humor Abuse is no lighthearted evening of sidesplitting laughs. Demonstrating elaborate pratfalls, juggling and elegant comedy bits, Lorenzo Pisoni’s solo clown show charts his upbringing as a fourth-generation vaudevillian and performer, focusing mainly on a relationship with his father that was more work than play. Lorenzo took to the stage in his parents’ company, the Pickle Family Circus, when he was only 2 years old, honing his clown skills under the tutelage of his father, Larry Pisoni. In recounting their relationship, Lorenzo projects a tone that is bittersweet and melancholy, with an undercurrent of both resentment and deep respect.

To read the remainder of this review, go here to the LA Weekly’s theater page (and scroll down a bit).

 

Humor Abuse

Mark Taper Forum

135 N. Grand Ave., Downtown LA

Tues.-Fri., 8 p.m.; Sat., 2:30 & 8 p.m.; Sun., 2 & 6:30 p.m.

Runs through Nov. 3. (213) 628-2772